Quick Packing Tip: Boots and Shoes Up North

One thing I learned from my recent trips to the snowy northeast is that you can’t wear ballet flats in snow. All of my shoes are flats. I fell several years ago and sprained my ankle and my knee, plus I’m on my feet all day doing presentations. I live in Texas, where we don’t really have snow, and if the snow comes the cities shut down. Going up to Boston, Pittsburgh, and New York, I was very concerned about the whole footwear thing. I didn’t want to go out to buy a whole new shoe wardrobe that made no sense in Texas, plus I’m on a self-imposed spending moratorium after the credit card spree that was my sister’s wedding. So I had to do some research. How do ladies who live in places like New York, Boston, and Chicago get to work without ruining their beautiful shoes in the snow and salt mess?

Here is the answer. Or at least what worked for me. Wear your outside boots, such as rain boots, snow boots, or, as in my case, super cute (waterproofed) knitted boots outside. Bring your inside shoes in a cute, professional looking tote. Once you get inside, change shoes and put your boots in the tote. Another tip–roll up your pants so they don’t drag on the ground. Then reverse the process when you’re ready to leave. Bonus: your boots are probably comfier than your dress shoes, so walking to and from the train will be easier. Yes, this is just one more thing you have to pack, but it solves so many problems.

I saw professional ladies using this strategy in all of the cities I visited. Of course, one lady brought her inside shoes in a Victoria’s Secret bag. But whatever works for you, right?

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